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The FDCPA and Collecting on an Illinois Debt

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”) applies to collection agencies, debt buyers, lawyers or other entities who regularly collect third-party debts as part of their business who are trying to collect on consumer debt. The FDCPA does not apply to business debt or in-house debt collection.

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Recovering Attorney Fees in Illinois

Bad news first. In Illinois, attorneys' fees are not always recoverable, even if you "win" your lawsuit. Illinois is an "American Rule" jurisdiction which means that each party to litigation pays for her or her own attorneys' fees.

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What Does an Illinois Creditors Rights Attorney Do?

Whether you are a traditional lender, like a bank, or you have a judgment or need to collect money owed, our law firm can help you enforce your rights to payment of a debt.

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What Is a Citation to Discover Assets?

A citation to discover assets is a tool utilized by a judgment creditor to discover and recover assets of a judgment debtor.

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What Is the Difference Between a Service Animal and An Emotional Support Animal in Illinois?

An emotional support animal is not a “service animal”. Unlike a service animal under the ADA, an emotional support animal has undergone no special training, and assists its owner by its mere presence - by relaxing the owner, relieving depression or stress, or offering a sense of safety or wellbeing.

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What Does a Warranty of Habitability Mean in Illinois?

Warranty of Habitability is implied or express in every lease agreement. A tenant can enforce this warranty by filing an action against its landlord in an individual capacity, using it as a defense to an eviction action initiated by a landlord based on non-payment of rent, and/or in a class action lawsuit.

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How Long Does a Judgment Last in Illinois?

Illinois, like every other state, has its own statute of limitations on how long a judgment can last. If a judgment was entered against you in Illinois, it lasts for seven years from the date of entry. Once the seven-year date hits, the creditor must file a motion to "revive" the judgment.

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What is a Non-Wage Garnishment?

A non-wage garnishment is the creditor’s attachment, post-judgment, of the judgment debtor’s property, other than wages, which is in the possession, custody or control of third parties.

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How Do You Get Back Personal Property in Illinois?

The procedure for filing a replevin begins with the plaintiff filing a complaint and subsequently making a motion requesting that the court enter an order for replevin by identifying the goods or chattels at issue.

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How to Form an Illinois LLC 2

Pick a name. The name needs to be recognizably different from the names of other business already on file with the Secretary of State.

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